In this case, creating a perspective depends primarily on the shape of the roof on which the installation is designed.
In the instruction below, we present our propositions of perspectives depending on the type of roof we are working on.

1. Triangular roofs.

*) The first suggestion is to use the entire length and height of the roof.


After entering the dimensions, we line up the perspective grid lines so that they align with the line of the tiles. After setting the line, we will most often get a parallelogram (only in the photo, in fact it is a rectangle) described on a triangle if the photo is taken at an angle, or a rectangle described on a triangle if the photo is taken straight ahead. When setting the perspective, it is possible, and sometimes it is advisable, to go beyond the roof with the rectangle.

*) The second suggestion is very similar to the first with the difference that we need the half of the roof and the height.

We set the dimensions and grid lines again according to the tile line. After the operation is completed, the side edge of the roof should form the diagonal of the perspective rectangle. When setting the perspective, it is possible, and sometimes it is advisable, to go beyond the roof with the rectangle.

*) The third suggestion is to set the perspective rectangle to any rectangle on the roof, e.g. a window, a characteristic feature of the roof, a specific number of tiles.

In the photo above, we adjust the perspective to a specific number of tiles, the size of which we know, which will allow us to provide dimensions.

2.  Trapezoidal roofs

*) The first suggestion will be to adjust the perspective grid to the shorter, upper dimension of the roof and its full height. This method allows the greatest accuracy and in most cases is the simplest, because at shorter distances we are able to set the perspective grid more accurately. After specifying the dimensions, set the mesh so that its lines coincide with the line of tiles or some element of the roof.

*) The second suggestion is to use the longer bottom edge of the roof and its height. After entering the dimensions, we line up the perspective grid lines so that they align with the line of the tiles. When setting the perspective, it is possible, and sometimes it is advisable, to go beyond the roof with the rectangle.

*) The third proposition, as in the case of triangular roofs, will be to set the perspective grid to a certain object on the roof, eg a specific number of tiles.

3.  Roofs with complex slopes

*) The first suggestion for placing a perspective on the above slope is to define a grid based on the short upper edge and the full height of the roof. The biggest problem in this case may be a good representation of the length of the upper edge on the lower edge, but if we match the grid lines with the line of tiles, it will automatically have the appropriate length.

*) The second suggestion to place a Perspective Grid for the present roof is to use a longer length and the height of the lower roof to the neck. This allows us to slightly shorten the mesh by almost half its height and the possibility of more precise matching of the mesh line to the line of tiles. In this case, we need to extend the grid line beyond the panel distribution area. In perspective, areas of the grid may intersect, which is not possible when selecting areas for panel distribution.

*) The third suggestion is to set the Perspective Grid based on the length of the bottom edge of the roof and full height. As in the previous example, we need to go beyond the roof area and cut another perspective area.

*) The last suggestion, as in the case of other roofs, is to define a perspective grid on an area that is a characteristic part of the roof or a certain number of tiles with known dimensions.